Why the Adjective?

What does “social justice” mean? How is it different from justice? And if “social justice” is different than justice, which is the greater goal? If “social justice” is the greater goal, does this make justice less than just? These are some of the questions that have rolled through my mind for a while now that... Continue Reading →

The Manipulation of Protests

One of the most significant philosophical texts in the 20th century is, After Virtue by Alasdair MacIntyre. Though a wide-ranging work of moral philosophy, it takes as its starting point the state of moral conversation in our culture today. MacIntyre imagines a world in which people use moral terms without any longer knowing what the... Continue Reading →

New Frontiers in Christian Apologetics

Christian apologetics is this strange field of work that is always answering two questions: what are the eternal truths worth defending? and, what is going on in culture right now that needs to be answered? The Christian apologist always has one foot in the eternal and one foot in the moment. When this is done... Continue Reading →

An Atheist Philosopher Dies

This strikes me as bone-crushingly sad. The Atlantic ran a short piece and posted a short documentary on the death of philosopher, Herbert Fingarette. The article opens with what can be considered the bottom line: In his 1996 book about death, Herbert Fingarette argued that fearing one’s own demise was irrational. When you die, he... Continue Reading →

Virtue Signaling

The columnist James Bartholomew claims to have coined the term, “virtue signalling.” He writes: To my astonishment and delight, the phrase ‘virtue signalling’ has become part of the English language. I coined the phrase in an article here in The Spectator (18 April [2015]) in which I described the way in which many people say... Continue Reading →

An Introduction to Wilhelm Röpke

“We need a combination of supreme moral sensitivity and economic knowledge. Economically ignorant moralism is as objectionable as morally callous economism.” Wilhelm Röpke, A Humane Economy Wilhelm Röpke (1899-1966) deserves a shot at the title: “The Most Influential Economist You Never Heard Of.” A citizen of Germany and decorated veteran of World War I, he... Continue Reading →

Trends I See

This series of posts are intended to be short thoughts on trends I see in the culture and church, both positive and negative. Given my cheery disposition, they will likely end up being mostly trending problems I see. These are not fully developed arguments, but the seeds of arguments. They are a placeholder for my... Continue Reading →

Socialism Mis-Defined

Our culture is wrestling with some big-picture economic questions. As polls show us, we are in a fairly precipitous slide toward the acceptance of socialism as a kind of universal panacea for culture’s ills. Having spent the first four years of my University education in economics, I am usually baffled by the general popularity of... Continue Reading →

Easter and Liberal Christianity

Around every Easter some large news item or set of columns make their way to the surface in which a few journalists tackle the intransigent Christian faith, especially the resurrection of Jesus. The point is always some version of the same idea – how crazy are those people who believe in the resurrection? Interviews are... Continue Reading →

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