Christian Love and its Fruits

Jonathan Edwards on self-love, selfishness, and Christian Charity (love): “Sin, like some powerful astringent, contracted his soul to the very small dimensions of selfishness; and God was forsaken, and fellow-creatures forsaken, and man retired within himself, and became totally governed by narrow and selfish principles and feelings. Self-love became absolute master of his soul, and... Continue Reading →

Totalitarianism, Loneliness and Meaning

Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism is a broad-ranging and powerful description of the rise of totalitarianism in Russia/Soviet Union and Nazi Germany in the first half of the 20th century. Born into a Jewish family, she experienced firsthand the Anti-Semitism that that came with those totalitarian regimes. The book was first published in 1951... Continue Reading →

“Live Not By Lies”

Alexander Solzhenitsyn penned an essay titled, “Live Not By Lies” in 1974, and it contains a lot of wisdom for people who feel the force of coerced opinion and speech codes in our culture today. If you don’t know about Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s life, I encourage you to familiarize yourself with him. He was a dissident... Continue Reading →

Defending True Truth

A little while ago I wrote about what I thought were some of the critical frontiers in Christian apologetics. None of them are new as in sui generous, but they are new in the sense that we have not paid much attention to them in the American culture for a while. I still believe all... Continue Reading →

All The Truthy Feels

Tara Isabella Burton’s book, Sacred Rites: New Religions for a Godless World is an incredible rollercoaster ride through the emerging religious landscape in the American culture. Throughout, not only does Burton catalogue new religions and religious practices, she insightfully analyzes the theology. She labels these religious practitioners the “Remixed”. They are part of the infamous... Continue Reading →

A Tale of Two Cities

With a title like this, we first think of Dicken’s novel by the same name. The cities are London and Paris during the French Revolution and follows the complications of intertwined lives between them during turbulent times. But I’m not thinking about London and Paris in the 18th century. I’m thinking about a much older... Continue Reading →

Swallowing the Poison Pill

Years ago, it was popular among young evangelicals to be enamored with postmodern philosophy and begin to interpret their Christian faith through its lens. For those who are not old enough to remember, twenty years ago postmodern philosophy created its own wave of popular Christian deconversion stories. We saw this primarily in what was called... Continue Reading →

Why the Adjective?

What does “social justice” mean? How is it different from justice? And if “social justice” is different than justice, which is the greater goal? If “social justice” is the greater goal, does this make justice less than just? These are some of the questions that have rolled through my mind for a while now that... Continue Reading →

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